DRY ROT & WOODWORM SPECIALISTS

Structural timbers in Irish properties are particularly susceptible to fungal and insect attacks. This is due to a combination of a predominantly damp, temperate climate and the traditional building methods used in construction. If left untreated dry rot, woodworm and beetle infestations can individually or collectively cause untold damage to the structural timbers in buildings, resulting in costly remedial repairs.
Dry Rot can cause extensive damage to timbers which are exposed to damp conditions combined with a lack of ventilation. There are many species of fungus which vary in the severity of damage they cause. Dry rot (Serpula Lacrymans) is one of the most destructive. The picture below gives us an indication of what Dry Rot can look like.

dryrot

 

 

Woodworm
Common forms of woodworm infestation include:
Deathwatch beetle, Common Furniture Beetle (Anobium punctatum), House Longhorn Beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus), Powderpost Beetle (Bostrychidae), Wood boring weevil (Euophryum confine).

Treatment

The type of treatment recommended will depend on the type of infestation, the extent of the damage and general conditions within the property.

Remedial wood preservatives and biocides

Our companies range of remedial wood preservatives and biocides are the most up to date products available and combine maximum effectiveness with the minimum level of hazards to the health and safety of the building’s occupants and to the environment.

Timber resin repair

Where rot and insect infestations have caused extensive damage to timbers, in certain circumstances we are able to carry out timber resin repairs to decayed sections of structural timbers. This is a highly cost effective low intervention method of repair which allows decayed ends of timbers and mid sections of the timbers to be strengthened rather than removing and replacing them from the building.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING SURVEY, DIAGNOSIS AND OUR RANGE OF REMEDIATION SOLUTIONS, PLEASE CONTACT DAMPDOCTOR ON 0870524366.

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